Schizotypal disorder is characterized by eccentric behavior and deviant ways of thoughts and emotions, which are similar to patterns seen in schizophrenia, but where there are not as clear deviations in the person's functioning as in schizophrenia.

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Symptoms of schizotypal personality disorder

A personality disorder is characterized by abnormalities in the personality. The condition manifests itself already in adolescence and continues into adulthood.

Schizotypal disorder is characterized by eccentric behavior and deviant ways of thinking and emotional register, which are similar to patterns seen in schizophrenia, but where there are not as clear deviations in the person's functioning as in schizophrenia.

The person has a consistent pattern of social and interpersonal deficiencies, characterized by severe discomfort with, and reduced ability to close relationships. 





In addition, mental (cognitive) and sensory (perceptual) disorders and eccentric behavior occur. 

The behavior will often seem deviant, eccentric, or strange. There is often a pronounced degree of suspicion or paranoid ideas, compulsive contemplation (brooding) and many unusual sensory experiences, including somatosensory (bodily) hallucinations / illusions, depersonalization or derealization.

The language and way of thinking are often vague, elaborate, metaphorical, over-detailed or stereotypical, and the person appears diffuse and difficult to understand. The person is on the verge of being psychotic.

 





According to the diagnostic tool SCID-II, schizotypal personality disorder is characterized by the following traits

 

  1. Self-attribution (not delusions). Can, for example, be an experience that others talk about you, or that you interpret events as special signs to you.
  2. Strange perceptions and magical thinking that influence behavior, and which are not just an expression of subcultural norms (e.g. superstition, belief in the ability to see into the future, thought transference, or "sixth sense", others can feel my thoughts ". In children and adolescents: bizarre fantasies and fixated ideas). 
  3. Unusual sensory experiences that include bodily sensory delusions. 
  4. Strange world of thought and way of speaking (e.g. vague, elaborate, metaphorical, over-detailed or stereotypical) 
  5. Suspicion or paranoid thoughts.    
  6. Inappropriate or limited affects.    
  7. Strange, eccentric, or strange behavior or appearance. 
  8. Lacks close friends and acquaintances beyond first-degree relatives. 
  9. Strong social anxiety which does not decrease if the person becomes more familiar in a social setting, and which rather seems to be linked to negative perceptions of oneself. 

 

What helps with schizotypal personality disorder?

The treatment of personality disorders aims to create better social functioning and adaptation. In addition, attempts are made to reduce acute symptoms, such as psychosis. Furthermore, support is provided to ride out crises in relation to those closest to them.

In the treatment context, personality disorders are divided into two groups: mild and severe personality disorders. The mild personality disorders include avoidant, obsessive-compulsive and dependent personality disorders, while the rest are considered among the most severe.

The main treatment for the mild personality disorders is long-term psychotherapy. This is done by a specialist. Some will need additional treatment for depression and anxiety.

In the case of severe personality disorders, hospitalization and medical treatment in crises may be necessary, in addition to long-term psychotherapy. Supportive talks with a general practitioner may also be relevant.